Discussion Papers 2007. 
Regionality and/or Locality 104-121. p. 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN 
STATE INTERVENTION, FOREIGN DIRECT 
INVESTMENTS AND DOMESTIC CAPITAL 
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
Introduction: Economic system in transformation between 
post-fordism and post-socialism 
The transformation of the economic system occurred in Europe in the last part of 
the  twentieth-century,  correspond  to  a  new  techno-economic  paradigm,  i.e.  accu-
mulation  regime
,  exemplified  by  the  adjective  post-Fordist.  This  transformation, 
inaugurated by the restructuring that followed the oil crisis (crisis of Fordisim and 
structural re-adjustment) is commonly associated with the so-called globalization
i.e. a process in which the traditional system of goods’ exchange became progres-
sively  more  and  more  integrated  in  a  world  system  of  production,  rich  of  new 
strong  geographical  selectivity,  but  able  to  create  a  global  optimal  geographical 
dimension
 of the organization of markets and enterprises.  
The changes occurring in post-socialist countries after 1989 has been often as-
sumed to result almost entirely from the shift from the centrally planned economy 
system  supported  by  a  mono-party  regime  to  a  market  economy  introduced  in  a 
democratic  political  system,  attributing  an  evident  post-socialist  flavour  to  the 
process itself. However, following Gorzelak (1995), it is also possible to substanti-
ate  the  thesis  that  the  decline  of  traditional  industries  which  began  to  happen  in 
Central Eastern European Countries (CEECs) after 1990 could be assimilated to a 
delayed  repetition  of  the  industrial  restructuring  which  has  begun  in  the  west  in 
early 1960s and was accelerated during the 1970s. Thus, one may look at the post-
socialist  transformation  as a  shift from  fordist to  post-fordist  organization  of  eco-
nomic, social and political life, that was not possible in a system separated from the 
global markets by economical and political barriers and therefore not strongly ex-
posed to international competition. 
The  truth  lies  somewhere  in  between,  as  post-socialist  transformation  presents 
both many post-fordist features as well as several peculiar elements that cannot be 
noticed elsewhere. In 1990s, when the process was at its start, the reform has been 
compared “with the building of a new house on old, crumbled foundations, without 
a  detailed  plan  and  with  only  one  third  of  the  materials  available”  (Paul,  1995), 
helping us to understand the atmosphere of uncertainty characterising the political 
and decisional stage of the first years of the transition, where no blueprint could be 
looked at in order to shift from “plan” to “market”. 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
10  
5
The  present  paper  aims  to  shed  some  light  over  the  above-described  process, 
analysing  the transformation  of  Polish  enterprises’  system,  as  it evolved  from  the 
peculiar  pre–1989  socialist  model  towards  the  present  market-friendly  scenario. 
The first part of the text describes how the application of the theoretical principles 
of  soviet-inspired  centrally  planned  economy  led  to the  consolidation  of a typical 
industrial  structure.  The  second  part  tries  to  read  the  interrelation  of  post-fordist 
and  post-socialist  features  characterising  the  transformation  process.  After  a  brief 
presentation of the general patterns of transition, the focus will shift to the privati-
zation  process,  and  to  the  exploration  of  the  different  agencies  structuring  the 
emerging  model,  from  foreign  investments  to  newborn  domestic  capitalist,  in  the 
light of a framework where the state, the general assumption of a passive role guar-
anteeing  more  market  freedom  notwithstanding,  pursues  a  strongly  active  neolib-
eral approach and shaped Polish reality in favour of the international capital. The 
conclusive chapter will summarize the outcomes of the paper, trying to re-conduct 
the analyzed process to its social and territorial implication. 
Polish organization of production under socialism 
Before  1800,  Polish  settlement  systems  were  constituted  by  some  hundred  cities, 
mainly  presenting  an  economy  based  on  agriculture  and  rural  activities.  Nine-
teenth-century  constituted  a  period  of  high-pace  changes  for  Polish  production 
system,  when  a sort  of proto-industrial culture,  mainly  generated  by  the  diffusion 
of  the  new  technologies  developed  in  England,  began  to  spread  throughout  the 
country.  The  industrialization  of  the  Polish  territory  throughout  the  nineteenth-
century was very uneven and lead to a general differentiation between more indus-
trialized western region and less industrialized eastern areas. The south and western 
regions  where  characterised  by  the  concentration  of most  of  the  manufactory  and 
mining activities (Silesia in particular). Also Wielkopolska developed a fair num-
ber  of  relatively  strong  medium  and  small  industrial centres specialized in  manu-
facturing and strong machinery production.  
The situation radically changed after the end of WWII, when Poland entered the 
sphere  of  Soviet  influence,  and  its  economic  development  became  subjected  to 
communist ideology and political goals derived ad hoc in close connection with the 
reality  of  the  Soviet  hegemony.  The  adopted  centralized  economic  model  was 
based  on  the  development  of  heavy  industries  in  order  to  foster  rapid  economic 
growth1 (Enyedi, 1990). The majority of the new state investments, centrally deter-
                                                      
1Following French and Hamilton (1983), the main goals of central economic planning were 
(1) the reduction of the gap between urban and rural areas; (2) the reduction of the socio-
economic  development  differences  between  regions;  (3)  to  avoid  as  much  as  possible 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
106
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
mined  within  the  COMECON  framework,  were  mainly  focused  on  the  develop-
ment of a large state-owned production system, and resulted in a high level of em-
ployment in the industrial sector, especially in such branches of heavy industry as 
mining  and  steel.  The  guidelines  regulating  economic  development  were  based 
upon long-term economic plans, taking for granted the determination in advance of 
levels of demand for given goods and services, the money supply, the inflation, the 
demand  for  labour,  the  distribution  of  productive  capacity  and  the  location  and 
structure of investment, as well as all the most important indicators, elements and 
phenomena relating to socioeconomic life (Sleszynski, 2006). 
In order to make the country self-sustaining in the production of strategic goods, 
and  to  urbanize  a  society  still  presenting  strong  rural  flavour,  a  huge  number  of 
factories were localized throughout the country, only in part following the pre-war 
industrial localization pattern (i.e. interesting the main industrial centres developed 
in  nineteenth-century),  and  mainly  next  to  medium  and  small  towns  and  in  rural 
areas (often favouring the establishment of new towns). 
Many government policies supported such a process of change, both advantag-
ing new industrial workers and disfavouring rural ones (e.g. forbidding the subdivi-
sion  of  agricultural  activities).  The  described  political  choices  radically  modified 
the urban structure of the nation, favouring a prodigious growth of many small and 
medium centres that therefore became highly economic-dependent from the indus-
trial plants in their proximities.    
After the initial successes in the transformation of the extensive growth model 
of the 1950s and 1960s (in the period 1950–1969 Polish GDP grew of the 250%, 
mainly  due  to  a  8,5%  yearly  increment  in  the  industrial  production.  Conti  1985) 
into  an  intensive  growth  model  based  on  rationalization  and  savings,  during  the 
second  half  of  the  1970s  growth  figures  began  to  decrease,  while  the  economic 
restructuring  showed  to  be  slower  than  expected,  leading  to  what  Kornai  (1980) 
labelled “an economy of shortage”. The technological obsolescence of polish facto-
ries and their excessive dimensions ensured that industries were mainly uncompe-
titive  due  to  their  material-,  labour-  and  energy-intensive  character  (Sleszynski, 
2006),  and  consequently  incapacitating  the  economic  system.  This  forced  Polish 
government  to  take  out  huge  loans  with  western  countries  to  keep  an  acceptable 
level  of  industrial  output  and  employment,  in  order  to  maintain  social  order  and 
control.  However  the  economic  inefficient  Polish  state-enterprises  were  less  and 
less  capable  to  play  the  increasingly  global  competition  game,  and  to  meet  the 
population’s growing demand. Such a shortage situation ended up with a wave of 
protest  and  strikes in  which  the  factor  of  economic  dissatisfaction  combined  with 
                                                                                                                                       
economic  and  social  contact  with  western  nations;  (4)  the  organization  of  a  centralized 
economic  development  that  left  few  room  for  market  influence;  (5)  the  creation  of  the 
basis for a future socialist society by education and propaganda. 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
10  
7
the desire for independence. The several revolts that took place all around Poland 
and  the  emergence of  Solidarnosc  as  a strong  social and  political  actor  led to the 
epilogue of the communist control over Poland, and to the first free parliamentary 
election of the 4th June 1989.  
When  examining  the  evolution  of  Polish  production  system  in  the  period  be-
tween WWII and 1989, two sets of consideration can be made. The first concerns 
the role assumed by the state: the evolution of polish production system has been 
strongly state-driven, with the state trying to pursue in practice socialist theoretical 
objectives  and  therefore  favouring  the  creation  of  the  so-called  socialist  society
Such a goal presupposed the adoption of an integrated approach to social economi-
cal and territorial development, and the state to assume the double role of driver of 
economic  and  territorial  development  and  of  provider  of  welfare  services  to  the 
population.  The  second  set  of  consideration  concerns  the  role  of  the  state  enter-
prises at the different scales. In line with the strong hierarchical flavour character-
ising the system, the central level was the dominant one, as it was the level where 
all  economic  goals  were  agreed  upon  (Sykora,  1999).  Nevertheless,  this  didn’t 
mean that the role played by the state enterprises at the local level was weak. On 
the  contrary  the  enterprises,  despite  a  weak  horizontal  integration,  interacted  in  a 
strongly  integrated  vertical  way,  and  nevertheless  the  continuous  decisional  de-
pendence  from  the  central level,  constituted  a  crucial  factor  providing  local  com-
munities  with  several  welfare  and  socioeconomic  services  (They  had  their  own 
shops,  schools,  sports  teams,  medical  care,  helped  during  construction  of  infra-
structure and during the harvest, etc.). 
These two elements, the strong influence of the state in the industrial develop-
ment (and therefore in the creation of a particular economic structure) and a wel-
fare system mainly implemented through the state apparatus will be used as inter-
pretative  lens  to  read  the  changes  characterising  the  new  structure  flourishing  in 
Poland through the transition period.  
Macroeconomic reform and general patterns of transition 
throughout the 1990s 
At the beginning of the 1990s, the weak policy priority given by polish government 
to  pivotal  themes  like  planning,  regional  and  local  policies,  social  services  and 
housing, etc. (Sykora, 1999) have often been assumed as the litmus test of a transi-
tion characterised by a sort of withdrawal of the state, in a scenario where the dis-
mantling of the old structure has been rather fast and its substitution happened in a 
slower and much more complex way. Nevertheless, the collapse of the old commu-
nist structure did not constitute a stop to the influence of the state on economic and 
development  issues:  only  the  mechanism  changed  (Paul,  1995;  Shields,  2004). 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
108
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
Even though central economic planning was reduced considerably, and the mono-
political power of the communist party has been replaced by democratic structures, 
the state didn’t play a neutral role in the reform, for it has been the main responsi-
ble  for  bringing  in  market-friendly  forms  of  governance  that  constitute  now  the 
main feature of Polish reality. 
In the new Polish transition scenario, instead of the state-driven top-down ar-
rangement peculiar of the previous system, the state began to play a role of coordi-
nation of the actions of the different agencies involved and, apart from the official 
discourse  of  a  “powerless  state”,  remained  the  crucially  important  political  actor 
(see part 6), and strongly contributed to the dismantling of the welfare/development 
state and to the creation of a friendly operational environment for foreign capital to 
massively  colonize  the  new  economic  system  through  the  privatization  of  former 
state-owned sectors, leaving few place for local private capital to develop and op-
erate (see part 5). 
Poland  began  its  social  and  political  transformation  with  the  burden  of  its 
socialist heritage. Whereas obsolete production structures (41% of the Polish GDP 
in 1989 was still created by state owned heavy industry. Gorzelak 1996), underde-
veloped technical infrastructure (in 1989 there were 82 telephones for 1000 people, 
and 69 km of roads for 100kmq. Szul/Mync 1997) and closeness of the economy 
could be mentioned as main negative characteristics, a well educated labour force, 
high  level  of social security  and  strong  development of  social  infrastructure  were 
the strong assets characterising the legacy of the previous historical period.  
Soon  after  the  overthrow  of  communism,  the  introduction  of  market  economy 
took shape, without any blueprint to refer to. The shared opinion on the edge of the 
1990s  supported  the  idea  of  a  fast  embrace  of  the  new  economic  model:  Poland 
started  therefore  a  so-called  shock  therapy  –  a  drastic  anti-inflationary  program 
combined with a fast liberalization of the economy (Brada, 1993), underestimating 
social costs and resulting in a deep recession and a breakdown of several branches 
of the economy (Parysek, 1993), that suffered a major drop in the output levels (in 
the  state  owned sector),  dramatically  growing  unemployment  and  strong  inflation 
pressure (Table 1).  
The  recovering  process  was  slow,  as  in  1989–92  the  official  GDP  decline  for 
Poland was -15%, and only in the beginning of 1993 it was possible to see the first 
signs of economic regrowth. One of the main worries of the different governments 
was the creation of economic and legal conditions to attract foreign investors. Po-
land  represented  a  large  potential  market,  and  Polish  government  worked  hard  to 
create  the  institutional  framework  for  foreign  and  domestic  capital  to  operate  as 
soon  as  possible.  In  the  period  1990–1992  foreign  capital  invested  in  Poland 
amounted  respectively  to  374  millions,  694  millions,  1300  millions  US  dollars. 
Such an acceleration has been the result of several factors, among them being the 
stabilisation of the general political and economical situation, the changing attitude 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
10  
9
of foreign investors towards CEECs and, most important, the introduction of more 
favourable rules and conditions for foreign investors (few or no restriction for for-
eign capital, the possibility to repatriate all profits, the introduction of several tax 
relief’s opportunities). 
Table 1 
Economic development trends in Poland, 1989–1997 (Previous year=100) 
Categories 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1996 
1997 
GDP 
100.2 
88.4 
93.0 
102.6 
103.8 
105.2 
106.5 
106.1 
106.9 
Industrial production 
99.5 
75.5 
92.0 
102.8 
106.8 
112.1 
109.9 
108.3 
110.8 
Agricultural pro-
111.0 
99.7 
106.8 
87.7 
108.8 
89.2 
117.8 
99.1 
101.7 
duction 
Exports 
100.2 
113.7 
97.6 
97.4 
98.9 
118.3 
116.7 
109.7 
113.7 
Imports 
101.5 
82.1 
137.8 
113.9 
118.5 
113.4 
120.3 
128.0 
122.0 
Foreign Investments 
73.3 
809.0 
185.0 
233.0 
253.0 
109.3 
195.0 
142.0 
109.0 
Fixed capital for-
97.9 
89.4 
95.6 
102.3 
102.9 
109.2 
126.0 
120.3 
120.2 
mation 
Inflation  
351.0 
686.0 
171.1 
142.4 
134.6 
130.7 
126.8 
119.8 
113.3 
Unemployment rate 

6.3 
11.8 
13.6 
13.7 
16.0 
14.9 
13.2 
10.5 
Consumption 

6.3 
11.8 
13.6 
13.7 
16.0 
14.9 
13.2 
10.5 
Source: Roczniki Statystyczne – Statistical Yearbooks, 1990–1998. 
The process of economic restructuring has proceeded, although not as fast as as-
sumed, through all the 1990s, and presented two different dimensions: 
−  the  collapse  of  several  enterprises,  which  has  not  always  reflected  the  real 
economic situation and growth potential, but often has been the result of ex-
ternal conditions (as the collapse of traditional markets); 
−  the growth of old firms and fast establishing of new economic units, mostly 
in progressive economic sectors, mainly due to foreign investments. 
A constant decline in agriculture has been replaced by a very high growth of the 
share  of  tertiary  activities,  reflecting  a  sort  of  rationalization  of  the  overall  eco-
nomical structures (Table 2). 
Transformation effects on the labour market were dramatic, with pauperization 
and unemployment hitting wide strata of the population. The decrease in the num-
ber of jobs due to the economic recession manifested itself from the very beginning 
of the transformation period. The total number of lost jobs in Poland in the period 
1990–1993  amounted  to  over  2  millions,  and  in  1994  the  unemployment  rate 
reached 16% of the economically active population. The economic reform resulted 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
110
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
in greater social polarization not guaranteeing a maintenance of their standards of 
living to most of the workers, mainly due to the growing polarization of incomes 
and in the precariousness of jobs.2 Moreover, state subsidies for several social ser-
vices, such as recreation, childcare, etc., have been withdrawn almost entirely (with 
the  social  insurance  system  and  pension  system  reform  started  in  1996  and  con-
cluded in 1998. Gorzelak, 1998). This led to a shift from a granted supply of social 
infrastructure  and  social  services,  to  the  privatisation  of  those  services  and  the 
growing impossibility to benefit from them due to the high costs.  
It  is  evident  how  the  scenario  just  described  has  been  characterised  by  a 
strongly growth oriented transformation. Investment efforts and replacement of old 
and  obsolete  fixed  assets  of  low  technical  standards  by  new  equipment  was  the 
basic  assumption  behind  these  scenarios.  The  text  will  now  go  on  to  analyse  the 
effect  of  such  a  shock-approach  on  the  process  of  privatization  of  Polish  enter-
prises. 
Table 2  
Creation of the GDP in Poland, 1989–1996 
Sectors 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1996 
Industry 
41,0 
43,6 
39,2 
39,6 
33,4 
32,2 
28,9 
27,1 
Construction 
9,6 
9,5 
10,9 
11,2 
6,6 
5,7 
5,2 
5,3 
Agriculture 
12,2 
7,3 
8,4 
7,3 
6,6 
6,2 
6,6 
6,0 
Other 
37,2 
39,6 
41,5 
41,9 
53,4 
55,9 
59,3 
61,6 
Source: Roczniki Statystyczne – Statistical Yearbooks, 1990–1996. 
Polish enterpries’ privatisation in the new market economy 
Several fundamental changes began to affect Polish enterprises after 1989. As de-
scribed above, to the considerable decline in the industrial output in the first years 
of the shock therapy (33% in the period 1989–1991) followed a fast growth of the 
production,  due  to  the  raise  of  domestic  consumption  and  growing  exports,  and 
thanks  to  the  fundamental  transfer  of  ownership  and  the  connected  far-reaching 
structural and qualitative changes taking place in the entire sector.  
The highest growth interested computer, plastic and rubber factories, electronic 
and electrical machinery, motor vehicles and precision instruments. Analogously to 
post-fordist  transformations  interesting  Western  Europe,  the  structure  of  Polish 
                                                      
2If compared with the socialist period, when the society was characterised by strong egalitarianism, 
income  differentiations  grew  exponentially,  with  the  richest  20%  of  households  having  an  income 
per capita 6 time higher than the poorer 20% (Gorzelak, 1998). 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
11  
1
industry  moved  towards  an  increased  share  of  medium-  and  high-technology  and 
basic  consumer  goods  at  the  expense  of  raw  materials  and  simple  semi-finished 
goods dominant under communism (Domanski, 2006). The centrality of privatiza-
tion to the transition is instead a post-socialist peculiarity, and focused on the effi-
ciency gains of the adjustments to capitalism, as privatization was assumed to pro-
vide  efficiency  through  private  propriety  and  competition,  motivating  economic 
performance.  Therefore  privatization  was  supposed  to  reform  not  only  the  man-
agement  of  enterprises,  but  the  economy  as  a  whole,  due  to  the  relationship  be-
tween private propriety and market efficiency (Kornai, 1990; Estrin, 1994).3 
The struggle around the privatization bill lasted 10 months, mainly due to dis-
agreement on its basic principles. The government wanted to implement a British-
style  privatization,  with  the  sale  of  state-enterprises  by  the  state  organs  through 
public offering. Part of the Solidarnosc establishment opposed the plan, preferring 
“employee share ownership privatization” (Kowalik, 1991). The support of Jeffrey 
Sachs was crucial to defeat this position and to break the reached legislative stale-
mate.  The  government,  and  in  particular  the  Minister  of  Privatization  Janusz 
Lewandowski, with the help of World Bank and International Monetary Fund and 
World Bank (that made their structural adjustment loan conditional on the adoption 
of the bill), rejected the “employee share ownership privatization” model in order 
to facilitate the concentration of capital. The legislation finally passed by the Sejm 
in  July  1990  was  ultimately  ambivalent  regarding  the  decision-making  and  pro-
gramme  design  of  privatization.  The  system  implemented  entailed  a  two-tier  sys-
tem  with  the  state  deciding  the  overall  direction  of  privatization  and  the  level  of 
revenue expected on annual basis (Shields, 2004). 
Two main forms of privatization have been adopted: by liquidation and the so-
called  capital  privatization.  There  are  two  types  of  Privatization  by  liquidation 
(Gorzelak 1998): 
−  Liquidation  on  the  basis  of  the  Article  19  of  the  Law  on  State  Enterprises 
(1981). Under this procedure the existence of state-owned enterprises as a le-
gal entity is terminated if it is in difficult economical conditions. In this case, 
the propriety of such an enterprise may be sold or leased, usually in parts; 
−  On the basis of Article 37 of the Law on Privatization of State Enterprises 
(1990). In this case a state-owned enterprise is liquidated, by selling or leas-
ing, to a buyer. 
                                                      
3As  stated  by  Schusselbauer  (1999),  “Privatization  should  result  in  a  new  private  and  institutional 
ownership  structure  replacing  the  old  sclerotic  state-administered  system  with  his  low  efficiency 
pressure and distorted market and price signals. There is little doubt that private ownership leads to 
an  incentive  system  in  which  the  costs  of  production  are  minimised  according  to  the  relative  price 
structure  and  the  output  structure  is  oriented  towards  market  signals  given  by  the  preference 
structure”. 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
112
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
Capital  Privatization,  based  on  Article 5  and  6  of  the  Law on  Privatization  of 
State  Enterprises.  A  state  enterprise  becomes  a  company  wholly  owned  by  the 
State  Treasury  and  than  issues  shares.  If  over  than  50%  of  the  shares  are  sold  to 
private  owner(s),  the  enterprise  is  considered  to  be  privatized.  In  many  cases  the 
shares are offered at the Warsaw stock Exchange.   
Also a sort of Voucher-type Privatization was introduced in Poland in 1996, un-
der the so-called National Investments Funds Program. The State Treasury became 
owner  of 512 state  enterprises,  managed  by  15  National  Investment  Funds  (NIF). 
Coupons  issued  by  these  funds  covered  the  value  of  the  enterprises  and  where 
made available to each adult citizen at a price of 8$. By the end of 1998 the cou-
pons unsold were turned into share and managed by the NIFs. 
The privatization process has gone through ups and downs. The peak in the pace 
of  changes  in  the  ownership  structure  came  in  the  second  half  of  1991.  By  1997 
some two-thirds of the original number of 8441 state-owned enterprises at the end 
of 1990 had begun the process of ownership transformation. In every fourth state 
enterprises  this  process  was  completed.  Up  to  the  end  of  2004,  some  7165  state 
enterprises  had  been  privatized  (including  1852  through  closure),  constituting  the 
85% of the entire amount. 
Nevertheless, none of the contending approaches to privatization has been par-
ticularly  successful.  Building  domestic  capitalism  has  proved  a  hardly  solvable 
problem for all Central and Eastern European states. Ownership changes have not 
brought  with  them  significant  amount  of  investments,  and  privatization  has  not 
succeeded in immediately creating domestic agents of capital.4 
In a transition path dominated by the believe that only with an appropriate level 
of  investment  it  would  have  been  possible  to  reach  high  growth  rates  in  the long 
run (Gorzelak, 1996), the scarcity of domestic capitals in Poland at the turn of 1989 
strongly slowed down the process. Therefore the crucial factor to successfully pur-
sue the wished scenario was the establishment of the framework of rules necessary 
to guarantee to foreign capital to play a strong role within the scenario itself. Sev-
eral incentives had to be developed in order to attract foreign capitals to enter pol-
ish privatization process. The presence of a big share of foreign capital resulted in 
the  establishment  of  a  sort  of  vicious  circle  that  contributed  to  inhibit  the  rapid 
development of domestic capitals, with the former starting to gain control of Polish 
market. In quantitative terms, of the combined earnings of the top 500 polish firms 
in  1999,  30,8  percent  was  constituted  by  foreign  capital,  against  19,8  percents  of 
domestic one (the rest still being State-owned enterprises). In 2000 foreign capital 
                                                      
4Restructuring  has  been  disappointing,  so  much  that  the  UN  World  Economic  and  Social  Survey 
states  that  “however  different  the  speed  and  depth  of  economic  reform,  one  key  problem  was 
common  …  In  none  of  [the  Central  and  Eastern  European  countries]  have  economic  agents 
conformed  to  the  model  that  the  policy  makers  had  in  mind  as  their  goal  when  they  launched  the 
reforms” (UN 1995: 163). 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
11  
3
had reached the 35.6 percent, while domestic one just 21.3 (Rzeczpospolita, 2001). 
This fractions are the dominant structures articulating the process of capital accu-
mulation in Poland, and will be further explored in the following paragraph. 
Foreign direct investment in the polish 
“capitalism without capitalists” 
Immediately after the beginning of the transition period, with the end of the state 
control  over the  market,  a  growing  number  of  western  enterprises  started to  relo-
cate  their  businesses  in  the  ex-socialist  nations.  Favoured  by  the  specific  legal 
framework appositely created by the government, foreign investment played a cru-
cial role in the privatization of state-enterprise apparatuses, proceeding at growing 
pace after 1989.  
The  entrance  of  foreign  capital  on  Polish  markets  could  be  divided  into  three 
different time periods: 
−  Before  1989:  economic  relation  with  international  capital  existed  before 
1989. Since the 1970s, several Western enterprises tried to penetrate the iron 
curtain and to locate part of the production in CEECs, in order to have access 
to a new share of market, taking advantage of Polish government consensus 
on the benefit of Foreign Direct Investments. Several franchising and licens-
ing agreements followed larger firms operating in the region (e.g. ZPT Kra-
kow  produced  Marlboro  under  licence  since  1973).  The  equivalent  of  a 
chamber of commerce, InterPolCom, was set up in 1977 to facilitate foreign 
direct  investments,  that  in  1986  amounted  at  $100  million  (Sklair,  2001). 
Nevertheless  several  attempts  of  “opening  up”  (e.g.  Gierek’s  import-led 
growth  strategy  of  the  1970s),  the  socialist  structure  inhibited  a  massive 
colonization of the economy, limiting foreign intervention to the creation of 
small  businesses,  and  permitting  large  production  only  under  franchising  or 
licensing agreement (Shields, 2004). 
−  1989–1991/2: this period was characterised by prudent industrial investment, 
mainly  operated  by  mixed  groups,  aiming  at  testing  the  characteristics  and 
the  stability  of  the  new  market  together  with  the  financial  atmosphere,  the 
real possibility to re-export profits, the potential delivery market, the political 
stability,  the  cost  and  quality  of  the  labour  force  (Michlak,  1993;  Buckley–
Ghauri,
  1994).  The  role  of  the  state  have  been  crucial  in  this  process,  as  it 
undertook  the  organizational  reforms  necessary  for  a  proper  functioning  of 
the new economic model. Among them are worth a mention: lifting the limit 
on the size of private firms, elimination of legal limitation hindering private 
entrepreneurship,  elimination  of  49%  limit  of  foreign  participation  in  joint 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
114
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
ventures,  establishment  of  the  Ministry  of  Ownership  and  Transformation 
(dealing  with  privatization),  opening  of  the  Warsaw  stock  exchange  (in 
1991), reorganization of a former institution giving obligatory concession for 
foreign investments into the Polish Agency for Foreign Investments, with the 
specific  task  to  promote  Poland  among  foreign  investors  and  facilitate  their 
intervention with financial deregulation (Szul–Mync, 1997).   
−  A  second  period, after  1993,  witnessed  the jump  into  the  stage  of  multina-
tional enterprises and the number of investments saw an exponential growth 
together  with  a  complex  diversification  of  the  investment  fields  (Blazyka, 
2001).  The  state  has  not  been  passive  in  this  process,  enhancing  legislation 
aiming to the provision of generous incentive like tax holidays and tariff and 
quota  protection  in  accordance  with  Prawo  celne  z  1989  (Costum  Law  of 
1989)  and  Prawo  z  1991  roku  o  spolkach  z  obcym  udzialem  (1991  Law  on 
companies  with  foreign  participation).  Due  to  the  exponential  reduction  of 
bureaucracy and to the increasing legal protection for FDI, particular sectors 
of the economy were gradually transformed from state-owned monopolies to 
transnational capital monopolies, in a process where privatization, instead of 
bringing  about  competition  and  demonopolization,  perpetuated  and  exacer-
bated  market  domination  and  concentration.  (e.g.  Fiat  and  General  Motors 
dominated  the  auto  sector  after  negotiating  state  protection  from  competing 
imports. Gowan, 1995). 
Foreign capital began to enter practically all sectors and branches, its most visi-
ble  presences  being  in  car  industry,  trading,  food  industry,  furniture,  electronics, 
and since the second half of the 1990s also in banking and financial services, now 
the main direction of investment (Szleszynski, 2006). 
In the beginning of the transformation (see Table 3), the main amount of foreign 
capital  invested  in  Poland  was  coming  from  USA  and  international  organization 
(i.e.  the  IMF,  the  World  Bank,  etc.),  and  the  situation  lasted  until  the  end  of  the 
1990s.  Nevertheless  the  striking  poor  presence  of  European  capital  in  the  early 
period, the share of foreign investment in Poland will invert in favour of European 
capital on the edge of 2000, and as of the end of 2004, 74% of all investments in 
Poland  had  come  from  EU15,  with  France,  Germany  and  the  Nederland  on  top 
(Szleszynski,  2006).  The  total  amount  of  foreign  capital  inflowing  to  Poland  con-
tinued  to  growth  exponentially  until  now  during  the  whole  transition  period  (see 
Table 4). 
As showed, during the 1990s, the main aim of polish legislation was to elimi-
nate  constraints  to  foreign  investment,  considered  an  essential  element  for  eco-
nomic  recovery  (Fischer,  2000).  Nevertheless,  while  contributing  to  revitalize 
through privatization a great number of declining state enterprises, several negative 
effect  are  often  associated  to  foreign  investments  (Paul,  1995;  Shields,  2004),  as 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
11  
5
the main share of profits they generate is re-exported outside national borders and 
does  not  contribute  to  positively  affect  national  development,  and  foreign-pro-
moted activities are usually easily to be relocated once the economic context is no 
longer favourable.5 
Table 3 
The biggest foreign investments in Poland by countries  
Country 
1991–1993 
Country 
1995 
Capital invested M$ 
Capital invested M$ 
 
 
USA 
1050 
USA 
1702 
International org. 
245 
International org. 
871 
Italy 
220 
Germany 
512 
The Netherlands 
210 
Italy 
378 
Germany 
203 
The Netherlands 
353 
Austria 
195 
UK 
319 
France 
180 
France 
275 
Sweden 
80 
Austria 
246 
UK 
78 
Sweden 
140 
Switzerland 
40 
Switzerland 
121 
Source: List of major investors in Poland. Polish Agency for foreign investments. Rzeczpospolita 22 
April 1995. 
Table 4 
Inflow of foreign capital in Poland, 1976–2005 
Year 
M $ 
Year 
M $ 
Year 
M $ 
1976 

1986 
16 
1996 
4498 
1977 
65 
197 
12 
1997 
4905 
1978 
25 
1988 
15 
1998 
6365 
1979 
30 
1989 
11 
1999 
7270 
1980 
10 
1990 
89 
2000 
9343 
1981 
18 
1991 
291 
2001 
5714 
1982 
14 
1992 
678 
2002 
4131 
1983 
16 
1993 
1715 
2003 
4589 
1984 
28 
1994 
1875 
2004 
12873 
1985 
15 
1995 
3659 
2005 
7724 
Source: Central Statistic Office. 
                                                      
5Furthermore, foreign investments proved to be highly spatially selective, since they hardly targeted 
decline  areas,  and  interested  mainly  those  already  affected  by  economic  growth,  leading  to  a 
worsening of spatial polarization effects (Cotella, 2007). 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
116
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
Coming  to  explore  the  development  of  domestic  capital,  whereas  in  Western 
Europe  large-propriety  owners  created  the  institutions  of  the  market  economy,  in 
Poland and other CEECs one of the main aims of transition was to promote private 
ownership through mass privatization. Following Eyal et al. (1997) it is possible to 
notice, that whenever the process of transition has been characterised by the rapid 
creation of the legal and institutional framework necessary for a market economy 
to work, this led to a scenario where the existence of new market institution com-
bines with a relatively scarce presence of national propriety owners. The resulting 
model is a sort of “Capitalism without capitalists”, characterised, rather than by a 
real capitalists class, by a complex network of cross-ownership, self ownership and 
ineffective  small  shareholding  via  investments  funds  connected  with  state-owned 
banks (Stark, 1996), with a new “power elite” controlling the command positions 
of political and economic institutions. Therefore, a new “Polish bourgeoisie” in an 
economic sense remains unfulfilled in a scenario where the only distinct owners are 
the state and foreign capital (Eyal et al. 1997). 
Even  if  a  first  wave  of  national  capitalists  emerged  during  the  1980s,  when 
Polish government favoured first attempts of privatization and the creation of small 
businesses,  partnership  with  foreign  capital  was  often  the  main  condition  of  the 
emergence  of  new  economic  subjects,  as  almost  no  capital  was  present  to  under-
take  private  investment  on  polish  territory.  The  introduction  of  free-market  proc-
esses stimulated the rapid development of domestic private entrepreneurship, with 
a  million  businesses  registered  in  1991,  a  second  million  achieved  by  June  1993 
and  a  third  by  December  1999  (Sleszynski,  2006).  Nevertheless  the  3.6  million 
firms  in  existent  in  Poland  by  the  end  of  2004,  most  of  them  are  small  activities 
frequent  family-owned,  and  very  few  are  large  enterprises.  The  main  role  in  the 
economy of the country is played instead by the largest firms (the first 500 firms in 
terms of income account for around the 60% of the national total), most of which 
depend from  foreign  capitals. The conditions  provided  by  the  state, favourable to 
foreign investment due to continuous deregulation, in fact constituted a strong in-
hibition  for  the  formation  of  a  solid  national  entrepreneurial  class.  Where  it  did 
happen, the relatively young formation and the limited financial capital, most of the 
time  leads  to  an  unfair  competition  with  the  foreign  counterpart  on  international 
markets, as well with foreign investors on their own territory.   
The Crucial Role of the State 
In the majority of studies concerning Central and Eastern Europe, the international 
influences has seldom been considered as a main driving force, while it is evident 
how the international scenario has been crucial, as Poland had to promote its own 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
11  
7
economic  development  inside  a  complex  international  scenario  influenced  by  in-
ternational multi-lateral institutions (Shields, 2004). 
As  underlined  by  Piazolo  (2000),  Polish  transition  had  a  strong  European  fla-
vour, as accession into the EU was always linked to political conditionality in the 
establishment  of  a  functioning  market  economy.  Also  the  International  Monetary 
Fund  (IMF)  contributed  to  influence  the  macroeconomic  reform,  guaranteeing 
credits and loans that created the necessary economic stability for commercial in-
stitutions and foreign  investments  to  operate  (therefore  constituting  a  sort  of  van-
guard of the capitalist economy). When it was time to take the hard measures in the 
period of transition, Polish government often used IMF and EU Accession Treaty 
as  a  cover  excuse  to  undertake  the  most  controversial  steps  (Szul–Mynk,  1997). 
But, as Rodrik (1989) affirms, to embark reforms formally agreed with the EU or 
the  IMF  in  order  to  enhance  their  credibility,  also  strongly  reduced  the  scope  of 
governmental manoeuvring and flexibility in arbitrary changing the policies. Thus, 
it can be said that the main directions of Polish development have necessarily been 
embedded in a wider international system, in an era characterised by international 
agents  overcoming  permeable  national  borders  and  configuring  the  material  basis 
for political processes (Rosenau, 2000).  
Within the described internationally influenced framework, the transition proc-
ess  transforming  Polish  economic  system  from  centrally-planned  to  market  ori-
ented, has been often explained as characterized by a withdrawal of the state from 
economic intervention. Although this argumentation has been very often raised to 
counteract  the  proposition  of  a  more  regulation-oriented  transition,  the  followed 
path presented a high degree of state intervention. As Shields (2004: 133) affirms, 
“one  of  the  ironies  of  transition  is  that  despite  the  collapse  of  state  socialism  the 
role of the state has not necessarily diminished, instead the nature of state interven-
tion has changed”: occurring in the context of contemporary capitalist world order, 
the government approach to the transition has been strongly influenced by several 
international forces, and reconstituted in favour of international capitals. 
Particular state apparatuses assumed the role of the leader in the sphere of pro-
duction  and  finances,  like  agencies  directly  connected  to  the  national  economy, 
such as Ministry of finances, progressively began to influence the role of the Min-
istries  of  industry,  labour,  housing,  and  progressively  subordinated  their  needs  to 
the one of international economic forces. 
The  minimal  state  philosophy  adopted  in  Poland,  characterised  by  a  laissez-
faire  rhetoric  hiding  strong  government  interventions in  favour  of capital,  nation-
ally found a strong justification in the resurged cultural beliefs in self-reliance and 
individualism, caused by 45 years of attempt to impose uniformity (Sykora, 1999). 
The slogan “the less government the better” was used in order to support abolition 
of taxes  on  foreign  capital,  to  phase  out  Social  Security  systems  in favour  of  pri-

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
118
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
vate retirement and to promote the privatization of historically public welfare sec-
tors.   
The  increased  power  of  capital  was  not  necessary  removed  power  from  the 
state. It is the nature of state intervention that has changed, intervening in this in-
tensification process and taking care of the interests of the international capital in 
order to benefit from further investment and reach faster overall economic growth.  
Examining the economic and the political as distinct moments part of the same 
totality,  it  is  possible  to  understand  how  such  a  neoliberal  economic  project  has 
been  preformed  through  the  harmonization  of  fiscal,  monetary,  industrial  and 
commercial  policies  in  order to fully  enable  the functioning  of international capi-
tals. Public intervention played a very important role in this process (as it appears 
clear analysing the legal and institutional reforms described in part 5), as political 
and economic leaders did not consider public involvement itself to be inappropri-
ate, but rather specifically social services-oriented ones to be unwanted.6 
Conclusion 
The  elements  described  above  show  how  the  process  of  economic  restructuring 
occurred  in  Poland  during  the  transition  period  has  been  a  complex  process,  pre-
senting both the features of a post-fordist transformation as well as a strong post-
socialist  flavour.  Capitalism  did  not  fall  on  Poland  fully  formed  from  the  sky  in 
1989, rather the state has been the architect of a specific type of transition, estab-
lishing new “rules of the game” and embedding Polish economy into a wider inter-
national scenario. Two main dimensions of such an approach can be underlined: on 
the  one  hand  the  enforcement  of  logics  and  laws  of  capital  accumulation  by  the 
provision  of  the  necessary  stability  for  the  new  market  economic  model  to  work. 
On the other hand the dismantling of the welfare system developed under the pre-
vious historical period that contributed to impose the cost of transition on labour. 
In the socialist period, nevertheless the long term objectives of overall economic 
growth, and in spite the rigid top-down structure and the weak horizontal integra-
tion among sectors, the society was the object of a complex system of service de-
livery  and  redistribution  operated  by  both  state  apparatuses  and  state  enterprises. 
Even though the original theoretic objective to diminish the gap between urban and 
rural areas and between the levels of development of the different regional realities 
                                                      
6In  this  direction  moved  the  already  introduced  reforms  of  the  pension,  as  well  as  the  lack  of 
corrective measures to fight constantly increasing social and spatial polarization. Unemployment is 
still one of the major emergence: peaked at 16% in 1994, it dropped to around 10% in 1997, due to 
the stabilization of the economic situation after the negative  effects of the firsts  years of the shock 
therapy. Since then it has been raising steadily towards the 20%  of 2001, the worst situation since 
WWII. 

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
11  
9
was  soon  given  up  as  economically  unrealistic,  the  decentralization  of  industrial 
production  and  the  creation  of  a  strong  welfare  system  contribute  to  the  achieve-
ment of a sort of social and spatial re-equilibrium.  
In the new transitional scenario, the state reorganized its role from leader of the 
economic  development  and  provider  of  the  benefit  deriving  from  the  economic 
growth in form of redistributive policies, to designer of the rules for new players to 
play the game and to guarantee national economic growth inside the broader global 
scenario.  
Such a transition path adopted by the state, aiming at the production of the ideal 
conditions  for  international  capital  to  operate  and  to  perpetuate  itself  within  the 
new context, did not produce equal development possibilities at the local level. The 
transition  process  proved  to  be  strongly  spatially  selective  and  only  those  centres 
that were able to attract capital fluxes, mainly foreign, and to offer valid guaranties 
to private investors, ended up with benefits. This situation led to two contradictory 
phenomena:  on  the  one  hand  the  consolidation  of  new  “pulling”  regions,  on  the 
other hand the inertial resistance to any transformation of the regions characterized 
by structural inertias (cf. among others: Paul, 1995; Bachler et al. 2000; Gorzelak 
et al. 2001). 
The  new  role played  by  the  state could  be seen  as Janus-faced,  strongly  inter-
vening in favour of capital but following a laissez-faire rhetoric when is referring 
to its role as a “redistributors of benefits” to the society. This attitude results in a 
substantial subordination of national and local interests to the international dimen-
sion,  and  degenerates  in  growing  phenomena  of  both  social  and  spatial  polariza-
tion. 
In  conclusion,  nevertheless  many  of  the  conditions  that  negatively  influence 
Poland’s  economic  development  potentialities  nowadays  could  be  imputed  to  the 
heritage left by the socialist system, it is evident how today’s growing spatial and 
social  disequilibria  are  also  direct  consequence  of  the  adopted  transition  model. 
The increase of goods and services available notwithstanding, escalating job inse-
curity,  decreasing  in  real  wages  hitting  weak  social  categories,  growing  unem-
ployment, lowering of employment conditions are the real flavours of a transition 
path that has as a main result the pauperization of the weak classes. Whereas inter-
national capital, new managerial elites and financial advisors are the winners of the 
transition,  local  communities,  working  class  and  socially  weak  groups  have  been 
definitely the losers, as their interests are more and more unheard in a governance 
system strongly entwined in the broader international scenario.  

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
 
120
GIANCARLO COTELLA 
References 
Bachtler, John–Downes, Ruth–Gorzelak, Grzegorz 2000: Transition, Cohesion and Regional Policy in 
Central and Eastern Europe. Aldershot: Ashgate. 
Blazyca,  George  2001:  Poland’s  place  in  the  International  Economy.  In:  Blazyca,  George/Rapacki, 
Riszard (eds.) Poland into the New Millennium. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.  
Brada,  Jozef  C.  1993:  The  Transformation  from  communism  to  capitalism:  how  far?  How  fast?  In: 
Post Soviet Affairs 2, 87–111. 
Buckley, Peter J.–Ghauri, Pervez N. 1994: The economies of change in Eastern and Central Europe – 
its impact on international business. London: Academic Press. 
Central Statistical Office: http://www.stat.gov.pl/english/index.htm. 
Conti, Sergio 1985: Il Modello Sovietico, Pianificazione territoriale e sviluppo economico in URSS e 
nei paesi dell’est europeoMilano: Franco Angeli. 
Cotella, Giancarlo 2007: Central and Eastern Europe in the Global Market Scenario: Evolution of the 
System  of  Governance  in  Poland  from  Socialism  to  Capitalism.  In:  Journal  fur 
Entwicklungspolitik. Vienna. Forthcoming. 
Domanski,  Boleslaw  2006:  Manifacturing,  Mining  and  Energy  Supply.  In:  Degorski,  Marek  (ed.) 
Natural and Human Environment of Poland. Warsaw: Polish Academy of Science, 233–244. 
Enyedi,  Gyorgy  1990:  New  Basis  for  Regional  and  Urban  Policies  in  East-Central  Europe.  Pecs, 
Centre for Regional Studies of Hungarian Academy of Sciences. 
Estrin, Saul (eds.) 1994: Privatization in Central and Eastern Europe: Key Issues in the Realignment 
of Central and Eastern Europe. Harlow: Longman. 
Eyal,  G.–Szeleny,  I.–Townsley,  E.  1997:  The  Theory  of  Post-Communist  managerialism.  In:  New 
Left Review, 222, 60–92. 
Fischer, P. 2000: Foreign Direct Investment In Russia: A Strategy for Industrial Recovery.  London: 
Macmillan. 
French, Richard–Hamilton, Ian (eds.) (1983): La città socialista, Struttura spaziale e politica urbana
Milano: Franco Angeli. 
Gorzelak,  Grzegorz  1995:  Transformacja  Systemowa  a  Restructuryzacja  Regionalna  (Systemic 
Transformation and Regional Restructuring). Warsaw: EUROREG-UNESCO Chair.  
Gorzelak,  Grzegorz  1996:  The  Regional  Dimension  of  Transformation  in  Central  Europe.  London: 
Jessica Kingsley Pubblisher. 
Gorzelak,  Grzegorz  1998:  Regional  and  Local  Potential  for  Transformation  in  Poland. 
Warsaw:Euroreg. 
Gorzelak,  Grzegorz–Ehrlich,  Eva–Faltan,  Lubomir–Illner,  Michal  (eds.)  2001:  Central  Europe  in 
Transition, Towards EU Membership. Warsaw: Regional Studies Association, Polish Section. 
Gowan,  Peter  1995:  Neo-Liberal  Theory  and  Practices  from  Eastern  Europe.  In:  New  Left  Review 
213, 3–60. 
Kornai, János 1980: Economics of shortageAmsterdam. 
Kornai, János 1990: The Road to a Free EconomyNew York: Norton & Co.  
Kowalik, Tadeusz 1991: Marketization and Privatization: the Polish Case. In: Socialist Register. 259–
78. 
Lipton, D.–Sachs, J. 1990: Creating a Market Economy in Eastern Europe: The Case of Poland. In: 
Brookings Paper on Economic Activity No. 1, Washington: Brookings Institution. 
Michalak, Wieslaw Z. 1993: Foreign direct investments and joint ventures in East Central Europe: a 
geographical perspective. In: Environment and Planning 25, 1573–1593. 
Parysek,  Jerzy  J.  1993:  Unemployment  –  a  socially  painful  stage  in  the  transition  from  a  centrally 
planned to a market economy: the case of Poland. In: European Planning Studies 2, 231–241. 
Paul, Leo 1995: Regional development in Central and Eastern Europe: the role of inherited structures, 
external forces and local initiatives. In: European Spatial Research and Policy 2 (2), 19–41.  

Giancarlo Cotella : 
Polish Enterprises in Transition Between State Intervention, Foreing Direct Investments and Domestic Capital. 
In: Regionality and/or Locality. Pécs: Centre for Regional Studies, 2007. 104-121. p. Discussion Papers, Special 
POLISH ENTERPRISES IN TRANSITION BETWEEN STATE INTERVENTION … 
12  
1
Piazolo,  Daniel  2000:  The  Significance  of  EU  Integration  for  Transition  Countries.  In:  Petrakos, 
George–Maier,  Gunther–Gorzelak,  Grzegorz  (eds.):  Integration  and  Transition  in  Europe. 
London: Routledge, 200–216. 
Rocznik Statystyczny (Statistical Yearbok) (1990–1998). Warszawa: GUS. 
Rodrik, David 1989: Credibility of Trade Reform – A Policy Maker’s Guide. In: The World Economy 
12, 1–16. 
Rosenau, James N. 2000: Change, Complexity, and Governance in a Globalizing Space. In: Jon Pierre 
(ed.):  Debating  Governance:  Authority,  Steering  and  Democracy.  Oxford:  Oxford  University 
Press. 167–200. 
Rzeczpospolita  1995:  The  prospect  according  to  the  estimates  of  the  institute  for  Market  Economy 
Research. 22 April.  
Rzeczpospolita 2001. May 8 2001. 
Schusselbauer,  Gherard  1999:  Privatization  and  Restructuring  in  Economies  in  Transition:  Theory 
and Evidence Revisited. In: Europe-Asia Studies. 51 (1), 65–83. 
Shields,  Stuart  2004:  Global  Restructuring  and  the  Polish  State:  transition,  transformation  or 
transnationalization? In: Review of International and Political Economy 11 (1), 132–155. 
Sklair, Leslie 2001: The Transnational Capitalist Class. Oxford, Blackwell. 
Sleszynki,  Przemyslaw  2006:  Socio-economic  Development.  In:  Degorski,  Marek  (ed.)  Natural  and 
Human Environment of Poland. Warsaw: Polish Academy of Science, 109–124. 
Stark,  D.  1996:  Recombinant  Propriety  in  East  European  Capitalism.  In:  American  Journal  of 
Sociology, 101 (4), 993–1027. 
Sykora,  Ludek  1999:  Local  and  regional  planning  and  policy  in  East  Central  European  transitional 
countries: In: Hampl, Martin (eds)  Geography of societal transformation in the Czech Republic. 
Prague:  Charles  University,  Department  of  social  Geography  and  regional  Development,  153–
179. 
Szul,  Roman–Mync,  Agnieszka  1997:  The  path  towards  the  European  Integration.  The  case  of 
Poland. In: European Spatial Research and Policy 4 (1), 5–36. 
United Nations 1995: World Economy and Social Survey. UN: New York. 

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.